Suggested Minimum Requirements

King Alfred’s English–Suggested Minimum Requirements

At the end of each chapter:

  1. Fill out the chapter worksheet on each chapter ( a 10-15 min. activity depending on the chapter).
  2. Under “Further Illumination” —
    1. Do all the “Not to Be Missed” items
    2. Pick a minimum of three “Expanding the Lesson” assignments to read/watch. Write a brief summary of each one.
      Read/view all the Literature and Primary Source items that are listed. Keep a list of them with comments about which ones you thought most interesting and why.

Every two units do the following (i.e., at the end of chapters 5, 10 and 15):

  1. Choose a selection of literature or primary source material from the previous two units and write a report (300 word min.). Do some research. Pick a title and a thesis statement for your introduction (after you’ve done some research). Include a description of why this work is considered important for literature and/or history, and maybe close with an explanation of your own opinion/response to the piece. Use at least 3 resources and list them at the end using MLA specifications. You might want to try using an automatic bibliography generator like this one:
    http://www.bibme.org/
  2. Pick one of the recommended movies you watched (or watch one now) and write a movie review. Before you write it, look up some film reviews here: <http://www.crosswalk.com/movies/>   Notice the elements they tell about the film and try to include those in yours. Name key actors, the director (you can mention what other movies he may have directed –find lots of info at <www.imdb.com> ), and anything else you like. Write the review as if it were for an internet site where lots of people of different ages would read it. Be careful not to include spoilers so someone could read your review before watching the movie.
  3. Take the test for the units you have just completed.

 

Help for writing a review of a movie or piece of literature:

Quoting from the link below — “Reviews typically begin with a summary of the movie/book you’re reviewing. They then often move on to a critical discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the piece. They may conclude with an overall assessment of the value of the movie/book. These typical features of a review might lead you to consider dividing your outline into three parts: (1) summary; (2) discussion of strengths and weaknesses; (3) overall evaluation.”
http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/planning-and-organizing/organizing
How to write a 5-paragraph essay: http://essayinfo.com/tips/organizing_essay.php